TASCO study

Several drivers of the rapid spread of HIV in the province have been identified as, among others, lack of male circumcision. A large number of observational studies and three randomized controlled trials concurred in their findings, that voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) reduces men’s risk of acquiring HIV by about 60%.

Following the publications of these results and subsequent endorsement by the World Health Organization and UNAIDS, Kenya rolled out VMMC services from October 2008.

By June 2013, our organization had performed 241,145 circumcision procedures. However, uptake of services by older men (aged ≥25 years) who engage in behaviors that put them at higher risk of acquiring HIV has been low, at about 30%. This study therefore evaluates the impact of two interventions (Inter-Personal Communication [IPC] and Dedicated Service Outlets [DSOs]) in recruiting men aged 25-39 years for VMMC services.

The objectives of the study:
i) Assess the rate of uptake of VMMC services among four categories of men: those exposed IPC, those exposed to DSO, those exposed to both IPC and DSO combined, and those receiving no intervention;

ii) Determine, through unlinked testing of blood from bleeding vessels from surgical wound, the proportion of men with unknown HIV status; and

iii) Determine the cost of providing VMMC among each of the three interventions vs. no intervention.


Our Partners


CONTACT

Impact Research and Development Organization
Baring Road-Milimani
P.O. Box 9171-40141
Kisumu City
(254)-057-2020132
(254)-727-688550
(254)-738-772119
info@impact-rdo.org

TASCO

The Research

TASCO STUDY

Several drivers of the rapid spread of HIV in the province have been identified as, among others, lack of male circumcision. A large number of observational studies and three randomized controlled trials concurred in their findings, that voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) reduces men’s risk of acquiring HIV by about 60%.

Following the publications of these results and subsequent endorsement by the World Health Organization and UNAIDS, Kenya rolled out VMMC services from October 2008.

By June 2013, our organization had performed 241,145 circumcision procedures. However, uptake of services by older men (aged ≥25 years) who engage in behaviors that put them at higher risk of acquiring HIV has been low, at about 30%. This study therefore evaluates the impact of two interventions (Inter-Personal Communication [IPC] and Dedicated Service Outlets [DSOs]) in recruiting men aged 25-39 years for VMMC services.

The objectives of the study:
i) Assess the rate of uptake of VMMC services among four categories of men: those exposed IPC, those exposed to DSO, those exposed to both IPC and DSO combined, and those receiving no intervention;

ii) Determine, through unlinked testing of blood from bleeding vessels from surgical wound, the proportion of men with unknown HIV status; and

iii) Determine the cost of providing VMMC among each of the three interventions vs. no intervention.

Our Partners