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  3. Corneli, A. L. et al. A descriptive analysis of perceptions of HIV risk and worry about acquiring HIV among FEM-PrEP participants who seroconverted in Bondo, Kenya, and Pretoria, South Africa. J. Int. AIDS Soc. 17, 19152 (2014).

  4. Mack, N., Odhiambo, J., Wong, C. M. & Agot, K. Barriers and facilitators to pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) eligibility screening and ongoing HIV testing among target populations in Bondo and Rarieda, Kenya: results of a consultation with community stakeholders. BMC Health Serv. Res. 14, 231 (2014).

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  6. Corneli, A. L. et al. FEM-PrEP: adherence patterns and factors associated with adherence to a daily oral study product for pre-exposure prophylaxis. J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr. 66, 324–331 (2014).

  7. Sokal, D. C. et al. Field study of adult male circumcision using the ShangRing in routine clinical settings in Kenya and Zambia. J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr. 67, 430–437 (2014).

  8. Corneli, A. et al. Perception of HIV risk and adherence to a daily, investigational pill for HIV prevention in FEM-PrEP. J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr. 67, 555–563 (2014).

  9. Westercamp, N., Agot, K., Jaoko, W. & Bailey, R. C. Risk compensation following male circumcision: results from a two-year prospective cohort study of recently circumcised and uncircumcised men in Nyanza Province, Kenya. AIDS Behav. 18, 1764–1775 (2014).

  10. Rositch, A. F. et al. Risk of HIV acquisition among circumcised and uncircumcised young men with penile human papillomavirus infection. AIDS 28, 745–752 (2014).

  11. Rech, D. et al. Surgical efficiencies and quality in the performance of voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) procedures in Kenya, South Africa, Tanzania, and Zimbabwe. PLoS One 9, e84271 (2014).

  12. Headley, J. et al. The sexual risk context among the FEM-PrEP study population in Bondo, Kenya and Pretoria, South Africa. PLoS One 9, e106410 (2014).

  13. Thirumurthy, H. & Agot, K. Voluntary medical male circumcision in Kenya--reply. JAMA 312, 2687 (2014).

  14. Perry, B. et al. Widow cleansing and inheritance among the Luo in Kenya: the need for additional women-centred HIV prevention options. J. Int. AIDS Soc. 17, 19010 (2014).

  15. Mehta, S. D. et al. Medical male circumcision and herpes simplex virus 2 acquisition: posttrial surveillance in Kisumu, Kenya. J. Infect. Dis. 208, 1869–1876 (2013).

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  1. Hirbod, T. et al. Abundant expression of HIV target cells and C-type lectin receptors in the foreskin tissue of young Kenyan men. Am. J. Pathol. 176, 2798–2805 (2010).

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  2. Mehta, S. D. et al. Does sex in the early period after circumcision increase HIV-seroconversion risk? Pooled analysis of adult male circumcision clinical trials. AIDS 23, 1557–1564 (2009).

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